June 16 
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • Vkontakte
  • Messanger
  • Telegram
  • WhatsApp
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest

June 16

8th SUNDAY OF PASCHA — Tone 7
Holy Pentecost: Feast of the Holy Trinity
St. Tychon (Tikhon, Tycho), Bishop of Amathus in Cyprus (4th-5th c.). Ven Tikhon of Kaluga (or Medin—1492). Ven. Tikhon of Lukhovsk (Kostromá—1503). Martyrs Tigrius the Presbyter and Eutropius the Reader, of Constantinople (5th c.).

Holy Pentecost

Pentecôte

In the Church’s annual liturgical cycle, Pentecost is “the last and great day.” It is the celebration by the Church of the coming of the Holy Spirit as the end—the achievement and fulfillment—of the entire history of salvation. For the same reason, however, it is also the celebration of the beginning: it is the “birthday” of the Church as the presence among us of the Holy Spirit, of the new life in Christ, of grace, knowledge, adoption to God and holiness.

This double meaning and double joy is revealed to us, first of all, in the very name of the feast. Pentecost in Greek means fifty, and in the sacred biblical symbolism of numbers, the number fifty symbolizes both the fulness of time and that which is beyond time: the Kingdom of God itself. It symbolizes the fulness of time by its first component: 49, which is the fulness of seven (7 x 7): the number of time. And, it symbolizes that which is beyond time by its second component: 49 + 1, this one being the new day, the “day without evening” of God’s eternal Kingdom. With the descent of the Holy Spirit upon Christ’s disciples, the time of salvation, the Divine work of redemption has been completed, the fulness revealed, all gifts bestowed: it belongs to us now to “appropriate” these gifts, to be that which we have become in Christ: participants and citizens of His Kingdom.

THE VIGIL OF PENTECOST

The all-night Vigil service begins with a solemn invitation:

“Let us celebrate Pentecost, the coming of the Holy Spirit,
The appointed day of promise, and the fulfillment of hope,
The mystery which is as great as it is precious.”

In the coming of the Spirit, the very essence of the Church is revealed:

“The Holy Spirit provides all,
Overflows with prophecy, fulfills the priesthood,
Has taught wisdom to illiterates, has revealed fishermen as theologians,
He brings together the whole council of the Church.”

In the three readings of the Old Testament (Numbers 11:16-17, 24-29; Joel 2:23-32; Ezekiel 36:24-28) we hear the prophecies concerning the Holy Spirit. We are taught that the entire history of mankind was directed towards the day on which God “would pour out His Spirit upon all flesh.” This day has come! All hope, all promises, all expectations have been fulfilled. At the end of the Aposticha hymns, for the first time since Easter, we sing the hymn: “O Heavenly King, the Comforter, the Spirit of Truth…,” the one with which we inaugurate all our services, all prayers, which is, as it were, the life-breath of the Church, and whose coming to us, whose “descent” upon us in this festal Vigil, is indeed the very experience of the Holy Spirit “coming and abiding in us.”

Having reached its climax, the Vigil continues as an explosion of joy and light for “verily the light of the Comforter has come and illumined the world.” In the Gospel reading (John 20:19-23) the feast is interpreted to us as the feast of the Church, of her divine nature, power and authority. The Lord sends His disciples into the world, as He Himself was sent by His Father. Later, in the antiphons of the Liturgy, we proclaim the universality of the apostles’ preaching, the cosmical significance of the feast, the sanctification of the whole world, the true manifestation of God’s Kingdom.

THE VESPERS OF PENTECOST

The liturgical peculiarity of Pentecost is a very special Vespers of the day itself. Usually this service follows immediately the Divine Liturgy, is “added” to it as its own fulfillment. The service begins as a solemn “summing up” of the entire celebration, as its liturgical synthesis. We hold flowers in our hands symbolizing the joy of the eternal spring, inaugurated by the coming of the Holy Spirit. After the festal Entrance, this joy reaches its climax in the singing of the Great Prokeimenon:

“Who is so great a God as our God?”

Then, having reached this climax, we are invited to kneel. This is our first kneeling since Easter. It signifies that after these fifty days of Paschal joy and fulness, of experiencing the Kingdom of God, the Church now is about to begin her pilgrimage through time and history. It is evening again, and the night approaches, during which temptations and failures await us, when, more than anything else, we need Divine help, that presence and power of the Holy Spirit, who has already revealed to us the joyful End, who now will help us in our effort towards fulfillment and salvation.

All this is revealed in the three prayers which the celebrant reads now as we all kneel and listen to him. In the first prayer, we bring to God our repentance, our increased appeal for forgiveness of sins, the first condition for entering into the Kingdom of God.

In the second prayer, we ask the Holy Spirit to help us, to teach us to pray and to follow the true path in the dark and difficult night of our earthly existence. Finally, in the third prayer, we remember all those who have achieved their earthly journey, but who are united with us in the eternal God of Love.

The joy of Easter has been completed and we again have to wait for the dawn of the Eternal Day. Yet, knowing our weakness, humbling ourselves by kneeling, we also know the joy and the power of the Holy Spirit who has come. We know that God is with us, that in Him is our victory.

Thus is completed the feast of Pentecost and we enter “the ordinary time” of the year. Yet, every Sunday now will be called “after Pentecost”—and this means that it is from the power and light of these fifty days that we shall receive our own power, the Divine help in our daily struggle. At Pentecost we decorate our churches with flowers and green branches—for the Church “never grows old, but is always young.” It is an evergreen, ever-living Tree of grace and life, of joy and comfort. For the Holy Spirit—“the Treasury of Blessings and Giver of Life—comes and abides in us, and cleanses us from all impurity,” and fills our life with meaning, love, faith and hope.

Father Alexander Schmemann (1974)

Troparion of the feast, ton 8

Blessed art You O Christ Our God / You have revealed the fishermen as most wise / By sending down upon them the Holy Spirit / Through them You drew the world into Your net / O Lover of Man, Glory to You!

Kontakion of the feast, ton 8

When the most High came down and confused the tongues, / He divided the nations; / But when he distributed the tongues of fire / He called all to unity. / Therefore, with one voice, we glorify the All-holy Spirit!

Acts 2:1-11 (Epistle)

1
When the Day of Pentecost had fully come, they were all with one accord in one place.
2
And suddenly there came a sound from heaven, as of a rushing mighty wind, and it filled the whole house where they were sitting.
3
Then there appeared to them divided tongues, as of fire, and one sat upon each of them.
4
And they were all filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak with other tongues, as the Spirit gave them utterance.
5
And there were dwelling in Jerusalem Jews, devout men, from every nation under heaven.
6
And when this sound occurred, the multitude came together, and were confused, because everyone heard them speak in his own language.
7
Then they were all amazed and marveled, saying to one another, “Look, are not all these who speak Galileans?
8
And how is it that we hear, each in our own language in which we were born?
9
Parthians and Medes and Elamites, those dwelling in Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia,
10
Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the parts of Libya adjoining Cyrene, visitors from Rome, both Jews and proselytes,
11
Cretans and Arabs – we hear them speaking in our own tongues the wonderful works of God.”

Dear readers,

This is one of the five free articles that you can read in their entirety.

To access the unlimited number of full articles, please:

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • Vkontakte
  • Messanger
  • Telegram
  • WhatsApp
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest

About the Author

Emma Cazabonne

Emma Cazabonne

Beside an anthology on Cistercian texts, Emma Cazabonne has translated and published articles on Cistercian spirituality, the Middle Ages, and Orthodoxy. She converted to Orthodoxy in 2008. Her husband is an Orthodox priest. If you are interested in having your book translated into French, she can be contacted here https://wordsandpeace.com/contact-me/

Orthodoxie.com Newsletter

Don't miss out on important news and updates. Subscribe to our free bi-weekly newsletter.



Divider

Popular Posts

Rencontre du patriarche œcuménique Bartholomée et de l’archevêque de Bruxelles et de Belgique Sim... 128904

Au cours de son séjour en Belgique, le patriarche œcuménique Bartholomée a eu une rencontre privée avec l’archevêque Simon, hiérarque du Patriarcat...

« N’oublions pas ceux qui ont souffert du communisme », déclare le patriarche de Roumanie Daniel ... 128902

À l’occasion du colloque “La chute du mur de Berlin et la révolution roumaine de décembre 1989”, organisé par l’Institut de scien...

Le patriarche de Moscou Cyrille se rendra en Finlande au mois de mai 2020 128893

Le patriarche de Moscou Cyrille se rendra en Finlande au mois de mai de l’année prochaine, ce qui sera la première visite du patriarche Cyrille au ...

Réception officielle du nouveau gouverneur civil du Mont Athos à la Sainte-Communauté à Karyès 128888

Le jeudi 14 novembre a eu lieu la réception officielle du nouveau gouverneur civil du Mont Athos, Athanasios Martinos, à Karyès. Le nouveau gouvern...

En visite en Azerbaïdjan, le patriarche de Moscou Cyrille a célébré un office d’intercession sur ... Asie 128882

Le 14 novembre, au cours de son séjour à Bakou, le patriarche de Moscou Cyrille a célébré un office d’intercession sur les fondations de la chapell...

Rencontre à Bruxelles du Patriarche Bartholomée avec le Conférence épiscopale orthodoxe du Benelux 128770

Le 11 novembre, le patriarche oecuménique Bartholomée a rencontré et collaboré avec la Conférence épiscopale orthodoxe du Benelux. Cette rencontre ...

15 novembre 58669

15 novembre Début du carême de la Nativité Saints Gourias et Samonas, prêtres, martyrs à Edesse (306) ; saint Habib, diacre, martyr à Edesse (322) ...

2 novembre (ancien calendrier) / 15 novembre (nouveau) 58667

2 novembre (ancien calendrier) / 15 novembre (nouveau) Début du carême de la Nativité Saints Akindynos, Pégase, Aphtonius, Elpidiphore et Anempodis...

« La présence des femmes dans l’Église orthodoxe » 128586

La Communauté des frères de  Taizé et la paroisse orthodoxe Saint-Césaire et Saint-Marcel de Chalon-sur-Saône, avec la bénédiction de Mgr Luka, org...

La renaissance de l’Église orthodoxe russe 128528

Christophe Levalois a écrit un article sur la renaissance de l’Église orthodoxe russe dans le n°622 de la revue Le Spectacle du monde, qui a pour t...

Le patriarche de Serbie a reçu l’ambassadeur des États-Unis pour la liberté religieuse internatio... 128492

Le patriarche de Serbie Irénée a reçu le 11 novembre, en la résidence patriarcale de Belgrade, l’ambassadeur des États-Unis pour la liberté religie...

Des inconnus ont profané et vandalisé des églises dans le village de Chalkios, sur l’île de Chios 128476

Le maire de Chalkios, Vasilis Vigas, a déclaré que les habitants du village étaient furieux lorsqu’ils sont entrés dans l’église Saint-Charalampe d...